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#1 ManicDavid

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 06:32 AM

Apologies if this has already been covered, but is there anywhere to get an extracted z80 assembly listing of either JSW or Manic Miner?

Thanks in advance.

#2 IRF

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 08:01 AM

SkoolKid's excellent assemblies, available in both decimal and hexadecimal.  :)



#3 Spider

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 11:39 AM

To expand on IRF's post a bit, here are some links to assist. Bear in mind this relates to the Spectrum version of these games:

 

JSW Disassembly Decimal or Hexadecimal

 

MM Disassembly Decimal or Hexadecimal

 

There are downloads of these for those who prefer to study them offline. I keep a local copy of them to look at, its worth checking for updates occasionally too.

 

One additional point to bear in mind the MM ones are based on the Bug-Byte version which seems to be the most common/popular one. The other variants of it such as the later original Software Projects release, the M.A.D (Mastertronic) and Ventamatic re-releases are slightly different. The re-releases are based on the Software Projects version.

 

Simple way of putting it: Out of the four 'commercial releases' there are two code versions: The Bug-Byte version and 'all the others' as such.

 

The changes are not difficult to work around, in summary a few sprites are different, the cheat code is different and code between about 33902 and 33718 is in a slightly different place, its typically only a few bytes 'away from where you would see it' in the disassembly though. John Elliott's page explains it quite well here too.

 

I think I've seen a partial one of the BBC version too possibly on JGH's site but I'm unable to locate said listing at the moment.


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#4 ManicDavid

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 07:05 PM

Thanks for the replies.

The skoolkit disassembly is amazing, and a very useful resource, but I was really after something that I could load into an assembler directly if possible? Unless it is possible to do that with skoolkit?

#5 Spider

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 07:10 PM

Thanks for the replies.

The skoolkit disassembly is amazing, and a very useful resource, but I was really after something that I could load into an assembler directly if possible? Unless it is possible to do that with skoolkit?

Not sure if you can do that with skoolkit. :unsure:

 

Do you have an assembler you wanted to use ? I'm only asking as its quite esay to turn either of them into an .asm file... which you can then insert into some assemblers and adjust as required.

 

For small scale edits to be honest I just fire up ZXSpin emulator and use that's built in debugger as it permits editing of code directly. Its quicker and easier than starting an assembly session. :)


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#6 ManicDavid

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 08:52 PM

I'm more used to Comet Assembler, although it's been a while since I've used it regularly.

Did you mean it should be possible to generate an as from the skoolkit files?

Edited by ManicDavid, 03 August 2017 - 08:54 PM.


#7 Spider

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Posted 04 August 2017 - 01:17 PM

I've not used that assembler. :)

 

I'm not sure (as above) if you can generate it in an easily extractable form with skoolkit, however I can generate an .asm file for you via ZXBlockEditor and then ZXAssasembler if needed, or you could download and use these yourself if you prefer a more DIY method.

 

ZXBE will allow you to export the data block as a binary file (so will lots of other tools to be fair) however you have the option if ZXA is present of sending it straight to that, and then from there you can edit *or* just export as a straightforward conventional .asm file.

 

If you want to save a bit of time etc I'll create the .asm for you but I'd need to know exactly which file you want it made from as such as there are variations, for instance the pre-release vs the normal release and then the later compilation release. To be fair the main difference here is the in-game tune as the pre-release uses "In the hall of the Mountain King" (Manic Miner in-game tune) and the normal release uses "If I was a rich man"  although strangely the compilation release (the one that's speedlock protected) uses the earlier tune, and has a keypad bypass of sorts plus the 'official' bug fixes.

 

Summary being if you want a quick ready to use .asm I'll get one but I need to know the exact file (link if possible) you'd want it creating from. Ideally it needs to be a tape file, .tap , .tzx etc although I can work from a snapshot such as .z80 or .sna if needed.


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#8 SkoolKid

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Posted 15 August 2017 - 05:06 PM

Did you mean it should be possible to generate an as from the skoolkit files?

 

Yes, you can generate an assembler-friendly ASM file from the SkoolKit source files for MM or JSW. In fact, that's one of the main points of SkoolKit - you can use the same source files to generate both the HTML disassembly and an ASM file.

 

You will need to download SkoolKit - for which you'll also need Python, version 3.4 or later - and use skool2asm.py to convert jsw.skool into jsw.asm (for example):

skool2asm.py jsw.skool > jsw.asm

I've successfully tested the output of skool2asm.py with pasmo, SjASMPlus and z80asm (the assembler that comes with z88dk), but it might work with other assemblers too.



#9 Spider

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Posted 15 August 2017 - 07:10 PM

I'll have to try that myself. Last time I wanted an .asm file I simply opened the file in ZXBlock Editor then sent the data to ZX Assembler and finally saved it out. Bit of a "long way around" I know.


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#10 SkoolKid

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Posted 15 August 2017 - 07:26 PM

One advantage of generating an ASM file from the SkoolKit source files is that it retains all the annotations. You can also generate an ASM file that includes several bugfixes:

skool2asm.py -f 2 jsw.skool > jsw-bugfixes.asm





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